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Wrestling’s Greats: TNA’s Aces & Eights Vice President Ken Anderson, The Company’s Number One A-Hole

IMG_8870The writers here at Wrestle Enigma are proud to present a new article series in which a figure in wrestling history is given a tribute. The second ever edition, only preceded by Bret Hart, is none other than TNA’s resident A**hole Mr. Ken Anderson.

Being a member of the TNA roster for close to three years now, Anderson has only recently found his place. Before he became what he is today, he floated around the mainevent scene in a very chaotic and informal way while garnering two world title reigns that didn’t mean much or seemed prestigious. Feuding with high level stars like Angle, Sting and Hardy; Anderson ended up on the short end of the stick on multiple locations until he finally hit a breaking point in late 2012.

After floating around in last year’s Bound For Glory Series, he was hand-selected by Hulk Hogan and Sting to be the latter’s partner in a match against the Aces & Eights. Anderson, whom then had a major target on his back, was immediately taken out by the dominant biker gang. Receiving no help from any other TNA roster member nor given any grief or appreciation, he disappeared from weekly television for months.

With no place to be or position to fill, Anderson was left alone with no supporters and not a soul grieving his absence. Eventually, he would be embraced and welcomed ironically by the very group that took him out in the Aces & Eights. Devon, then Sgt Of Arms of the group, inducted him into the group due to his past experiences in the feuds he had with Sting and Angle. Those two were proving to be the bane of the group’s existence and Anderson provided some much needed brains, vocal work and star power to the dwindling faction.

Mr. Anderson

The original, brash showmen had now become a bitter warrior working for an evil empire that had a strict goal of running TNA and insuring their president Bully Ray remainsWorld Heavyweight Champion. Picking up victories over Samoa Joe, Kurt Angle and James Storm; he rose in the ranks of the gang and eventually became the Vice President and second in charge.

After disposing of lesser members of his own group in DOC and D’Lo Brown, he has shaped the Aces & Eights into a tight-knit brotherhood. In many ways now, without Devon to counter balance power, Anderson has risen to the point of almost being in complete control over the gang. Though the TNA World Heavyweight Champion Bully Ray may be the supposed head of the stable, Anderson is the one who leads his brothers into battle and is the tactical mastermind that has allowed Aces & Eights to last this long. Ray, whose too occupied with the title and his love life, may have lost his men’s respect and could very well be losing his share of power.

With Anderson being very likely to make the final four in the Bound For Glory Series, tension between him and Bully Ray is bound to increase even more and the Aces & Eights could internally explode soon enough. Anderson has the backing of Knux, Garrett Bischoff and Wes Brisco the last remaining soldiers while Ray only has his girlfriend and his new best friend “The Huntington Beach Bad Boy” Tito Ortiz. Anderson and Ray could be colliding eventually but it’s likely that the A**hole will continue on with or without the Aces & Eights.

Always the one to poke fun at his enemies, to have a good time out in the ring, and to be as audacious as possible; Anderson’s place in TNA history will always be as its rightful “Number One A**hole”. Will he ever get another and more solid World Heavyweight Championship run? That could be unlikely but the Aces & Eights have revived his career in many ways. Since this year began, Anderson has gotten into better wrestling shape while becoming a far more focused yet still wacky and very entertaining character. In fact, the faction has done wonders to the men who’ve been involved in it and the subject of this week’s edition is a great example of it.

No longer directionless or giving sub-par performances as he did a couple years ago, Anderson is back in the driver’s seat and if he continues to deliver as well as he has now then he should continue to be a solid contributor to TNA’s overall story arc and upper-midcard, mainevent hierarchy.

About Jacob Stachowiak

I'd explain it to you better but I left my crayons in my other jacket.